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Love Island, Big Brother 22 both film soon, and Love Island is moving to Las Vegas

CBS is starting production on Big Brother 22, an all-star season, and simultaneously the second season of Love Island, which is following the lead of ABC’s The Bachelorette and being filmed entirely at a hotel in the United States.

Will these productions end up producing normal seasons of these summer reality shows? Or will they kill people, like hotel staff, crew members, or even contestants? Or maybe just leave them with long-term damage to their health? And if so, will it all have been worth it to give fans the reality TV they’re craving because they can’t possibly find anything else on TV right now? We’ll soon find out!

Love Island, CBS

Love Island season one filmed in Fiji, which offers a massive 45 percent rebate to productions, basically meaning it costs half as much to produce there.

Survivor has not yet resumed production on season 41 because it does not yet have a plan to film there safely. Season two of Love Island was supposed to film in Fiji and premiere May 21, but was delayed.

Now Love Island is moving to Las Vegas, where it will film at The Cromwell, Vulture just reported. (It’s a considerably smaller and less-involved production than Survivor, which has a crew of 600+ people.)

Clark County, Nevada, where Las Vegas is located, is in the middle of an outbreak.

That hotel is directly on the Las Vegas strip, across the street from Caesar’s Palace. The building was previously known as Barbary Coast and then Bill’s Gamblin’ Hall and Saloon, and has been The Cromwell since 2014. The boutique hotel’s web site says it’s “temporarily closed.”

Vulture’s Joe Adalian reports that “CBS and ITV Entertainment, which declined comment for this story, are now hoping to premiere the Vegas-set Love Island by the end of the summer.”

Season one aired 22 episodes, five nights per week, over one month. It’s unclear how long season two will last or what its schedule will be; it was not part of CBS’s fall schedule, though neither was Big Brother, and it’s also unclear when exactly fall TV will premiere.

Big Brother’s all-star plans and reported cast

BB21, Big Brother 21, BBUS season 21

Since early June, reports have said CBS would turn BB22 into an all-star season, which saves them having to do an extensive casting process, especially in-person finals casting.

Earlier this week, that appeared to be confirmed when the store on CBS’s website briefly showed Big Brother All-Stars merchandise with a new version of the show’s logo. That merchandise was quickly removed.

Hamsterwatch reported that “that the CBS premiere was scheduled for August 5,” though “all dates and plans are subject to change.”

That’d be two weeks from today, and would not allow for two weeks of isolation plus the standard week that the houseguests are in the house before the show actually premieres and the live feeds kick in.

A Twitter feed that posts photos taken from a drone showed the Big Brother soundstage and its back yard space yesterday, and it’s clear that construction is underway, though it not yet near production-ready, and still has remnants of last year’s decor. A photo taken the week of July 6 showed the back yard looking like a storage area, so there’s been definite progress.

Today, TMZ reported nine former Big Brother players arrived in Los Angeles Tuesday for testing and isolation before entering the house:

  • Hayden Moss, BB12 winner
  • Ian Terry, BB14 winner
  • Nicole Franzel, BB18 winner
  • Josh Martinez, BB19 winner
  • Daniele Donato, BB8 runner-up
  • Tyler Crispen, BB20 runner-up
  • Janelle Pierzina, BB6, BB7, and BB14 houseguest
  • Bayleigh Dayton, BB20 houseguest
  • Paulie Calafiore, BB18 houseguest

That list may change, depending upon test results or other factors, and it may also not be complete or accurate. (Hamsterwatch is skeptical.)

If Big Brother 22 is premiering in two weeks, CBS will likely make an official announcement within the next week—though the show typically does not announce anything until the cast is sequestered and locked in.

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  • Andy Dehnart is the creator of reality blurred and a writer and teacher who obsessively and critically covers reality TV and unscripted entertainment, focusing on how it’s made and what it means. Learn more about Andy.

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