reality shows helping A&E succeed.

reality shows helping A&E succeed.
A&E’s relentless focus on reality television programming was a strategy designed to attract the kids with cheap shows. And it worked: In “2004, A&E’s ratings rose 34 percent among adults 18-49, and 76 percent among adults 18-34,” Mediaweek reports. Plus, “A&E last year snagged 24 Emmy nominations—more than any other ad-supported cable net.” The network’s new president, Abbe Raven, says, “When we set out to transform A&E, we went after nonscripted programs because we knew it would resonate with younger audiences. We knew we could execute it quickly and, from a production standpoint, we knew we could roll out with it continually.” The network’s successes include Airline; Dog the Bounty Hunter, which kicked off its second season last night; Family Plots; Intervention, which is averaging 1.3 million viewers; and Knievel’s Wild Ride, which also kicked off last night and follows Robby Knievel’s attempts to not die while doing crazy stuff. A&E is doing so well that The Boston Globe also has a write-up about its success, giving the network yet another tongue kiss.

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