Man vs. Food host’s horrific reply to a critic; Big Brother cast; unedited Honey Boo Boo is a “monster”

Reality TV news from this week

  • Man vs. Food star Adam Richman’s social media fight with a woman is rather unbelievable, in part because he told her to kill herself after using a slur. After the person objected to Richaman’s use of the hashtag “thinspiration,” because of its popularity among those who are pro anorexia and pro bulimia. Jezebel has details and screenshots: In an Instagram reply, he suggested the person he disagreed with “grab a razor blade & draw a bath” and added “I doubt anyone will miss you,” after saying, “If anyone acts like a cunt I’ll call them one. It’s not misogyny, it’s calling a spade a spade.” A later reply told her to “eat a bag of shit” and said he wouldn’t apologize, and that the “only fuckup it seems was your Dad’s choice to go without a condom.”
  • Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey and its host Neil DeGrasse Tyson won Critics’ Choice Television Awards from the Broadcast Television Journalists Association, which also awarded Shark Tank as best reality competition. These are different than the Television Critics Association awards, and one writer makes a case for the “Utter Pointlessness and Anti-Critical Stance” of the BTJA’s awards.
  • Former Dancing with the Stars co-host Samantha Harris might undergo chemotherapy after having a double mastectomy for breast cancer, because it spread to one of her lymph nodes.
  • The edited version of Honey Boo Boo’s appearance on The Tonight Show is very different than what happened in real life. Christy O’Shoney describes Honey Boo Boo’s actual behavior as being fed lines by her mother and acting like “a tiny, dimpled monster”–including hitting her mother.
  • Speaking of monsters, the cast of Big Brother 16 was announced yesterday: all new contestants, though one is the brother of actor and singer Ariana Grande.
  • Deadline reports that “DGA and WGA members sometimes use fake onscreen names so they can work on nonunion reality shows” to avoid being discovered. The story speciifcally cites nonunion series such as The Bachelor/ette and The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. One DGA director says “it’s been going on for years.”
  • Andi Dorfman resigned her job as a lawyer after taking a leave of absence to film The Bachelorette. Her resignation letter does ask her boss, the district attorney, if he’ll “strongly consider [her] for re-hire” once her “obligations will have concluded.”
  • Pawn Stars‘ Rick Harrison agreed to sell a tiara belonging to William McKinley’s wife to the former president’s library for the price he paid: $43,000, a transaction that was featured on the show.The museum’s curator said that as she watched the episode, “I was yelling at the screen, ‘Can this be happening?’”
  • Adam Levine said that The Voice has “a ways to go if it wants to have as profound an impact as Idol” and said that “there are problems” because “Millions of people watch the show every week and fall in love with a singer, then you don’t hear much from them.”
  • American Idol will give $50,000 to the contestant’s “true believer”–a person they designate at some point in the competition, and who may or may not have encouraged them to apply. Here are the rules.
  • Chelsea Handler’s Netflix talk show will be preceded by “four new docu-comedy specials exclusively for Netflix featuring her efforts to gain a better understanding on a variety of subjects ranging from NASCAR to politics and from Silicon Valley to the NBA draft,” Netflix said.
  • Ugh, that twit Dr. Drew is telling us something we already know: some reality TV shows use alcohol to increase drama.
  • Two people who apepared on My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding were arrested for felony larceny, accused of stealing wedding rings and $1,000 from a bride at a wedding where one of them was the maid of honor.
  • NBC’s new Bear Grylls show Running Wild With Bear Grylls will take celebrities into the wilderness for 48 hours. The six who’ve been cast: Channing Tatum, Zac Efron, Deion Sanders, Ben Stiller, Tamron Hall, and Tom Arnold.
  • The pilot for a new Spike series filmed in Portland and will apparently be a competition between two people to take over a company–in this case, a limo business.

A longer read

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.