Biggest Loser ignores romance if couple is fat; Mad Men vs. Nerdist; Cards Against Humanity’s competition

News you may have missed over the last week:

  • BAFTA- and Oscar-winning documentary filmmaker Malik Bendjelloul killed himself last week. His film Searching for Sugar Man was completed using an iPhone app after he ran out of money to produce it.
  • The Bachelorette premieres tonight, and Andi Dorfman told People that when she learned of contestant Eric Hill’s death, “I had just seen him. He was a member of our cast and we had an inherent bond. The [other contestants] shared that bond too. It was shocking and devastating to all of us and it’s still a tough thing that we’re going through.” She also said, “I will always remember Eric’s love for life. People say, ‘Oh he lived life to the fullest.’ But Eric really was the epitome of someone who lived life to the fullest.”
  • At ABC’s upfront presentation last week, Jimmy Kimmel joked about the last season of The Bachelor: “We made history this year with Juan Pablo Galavis, our first non-white Bachelor, and everyone hated him so we’re not doing that again.”
  • Former Biggest Loser contestant Kai Hibbard told Cracked about things that aren’t shown on TV, including relationships that develop while the contestants are still fat: “They’d straight up refuse to follow actual couples to catch a glimmer of real romance because, and this was their actual reasoning, ‘Who wants to see two obese people making out?’”
  • Bob Harper said some vague things about how The Biggest Loser might respond to Rachel Frederickson’s shocking weight loss: “I think the producers are in meetings right now trying to figure out how it can be regulated more [...] I think you are going to be seeing new rules.”
  • Pakistan “has three dedicated food networks,” according to NBC News in a story about the country’s version of Masterchef.
  • Jessica Simpson promised to not do any more reality TV. The Newlyweds: Nick and Jessica star said, “I am blessed that I did have that show. It allowed people to come into my life, and to know me as a person, and I owe a lot of my support — my fans came from that because people could relate to me.” But she will “absolutely not ever do reality TV again.”
  • Duck Dynasty cast members helped set a world record at an event Sunday night: The Call: Faith, Family and Facial Hair.
  • Duck Dynasty‘s Uncle Si Robertson released a country music EP last week: Me and My Smokin Hot Honey.

Upcoming:

  • AMC announced it will soon air All Star Celebrity Bowling, which is exactly what it sounds like and will be produced by High Noon and Nerdist’s Chris Hardwick and Seth Laderman. The pilot episode’s cast consisted of Hardwick, Nathan Fillon, Thomas Lennon, and Pete Holmes versus Mad Men cast members Jon Hamm, Rich Sommer, Vincent Cartheiser, and Jay Ferguson. Eight episodes will air; the competition will benefit charities somehow.
  • Top Chef is now filming in Boston.
  • The Comeback is filming its comeback.

Something to watch:

  • The creators of Cards Against Humanity, which is the best game ever if you have a disturbing sense of humor like me (after all, its tagline is “A party game for horrible people”) have a web series that follows a contest they’re sponsoring to give independent tabletop game developers. Each hit-or-miss episode of Tabletop Deathmatch is about one of the top 16 games, which gets scrutinized by game industry people, and it’s not always fascinating to listen to someone describe their game. The ultimate winner will have their game produced by Cards Against Humanity but “will own the whole thing and keep 100% of the profits.”

The first episode introduces the contest and the Cards Against Humanity team, and includes the phrase “Tribble strap-on.” Watch it:

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.