Survivor’s magnanimous, selfless queen graciously steps aside to let others play

Morgan may have been voted out during last night’s Survivor Cagayan Tribal Council, but her impact on the tribe was illustrated, literally, on the votes. Her fellow tribe members cared so much about her that they not only took the time to adorn her one of her votes with a portrait of her amazing body, but they also gave her the title she deserved: Queen Morgan.

Morgan exits the game as one of the best and most selfless players in its history. She graciously stepped aside and let other people take the spotlight. She never once tried to selfishly affect the outcome of challenges or make friends, but instead let others actively play the game they’d flown to the Philippines to play.

Morgan was such a powerful and well-liked player that she was able to be voted out despite Jeff Probst’s badgering of her tribemates to keep her and do something more interesting at Tribal Council. By explaining how she deserved to stick around until the very end where she could let someone else win, Probst enhanced her reputation so much that the majority of the tribe, in awe of her amazingness, was compelled to write her name down.

“I just want to say how proud I am of myself,” she said during her exit interview. Demonstrating how she places others first, Morgan added, “They can say whatever they want at tribal, that I was spiteful or that I was lazy, but I could care less.” That’s just so awesome: Morgan actually could do less caring, but she doesn’t! Whoever cast her deserves a bonus.

While Morgan was “used to things being easy for me and not having to work that hard to get things,” as she humbly confessed, her fellow tribe members were never aware of her position in life. They were instead so entranced by her luxurious softness and the comfort that Tony compared her to the very thing that gives him comfort for about one-third of every day: a pillow.

Of course Morgan’s team won the reward challenge and got to appreciate the labors of CBS’ ad sales department, because Morgan was there. Why did Spencer and LJ finish their puzzle so fast even though the other team were in the lead? Because Morgan was standing there, distracting the other team with her radiance and assisting her team by casting a glow onto their puzzle.

Because she is so fond of working with other people, Morgan even participated in the episode’s highlight (I mean, the highlight other than every moment when Morgan was on screen): a search for the Tyler Perry idol to make sure everyone understood the gravity of what was happening.

The clue Spencer found at the reward triggered by what was perhaps the most comical idol-searching series of events ever, all filmed exceptionally well: Woo stalking Spencer, Spencer leaving his clue on his pants, Woo running back to tattle to the others, everyone running around and shouting about the idol, Spencer eventually uncovering and stuffing the idol in his shorts while Kass stood nearby.

Morgan foreshadowed the events that would permit Spencer to discover the idol: At the beginning of the episode, she gave Kass a pep talk, using all of her rhetorical skills to help Kass’ self-esteem (yes, Morgan took time to do that: she’s just that amazing).

Of course, someone as attractive as Morgan never would have just stood by and let Spencer uncover an idol without her noticing; someone as attractive as Morgan would have told someone else to watch Spencer carefully while Morgan took on the difficult task of making sure the floor of the shelter remained firmly in place.

She excelled so much at doing nothing that she lasted a full 25 minutes in the immunity challenge, which involved standing completely still, which you may have noticed is one of her many strengths. She outlasted four people, but because she’s so gracious, she let four other people battle it out for immunity. Spencer finally won, making a face the whole time that clearly said, I am thinking about Morgan and winning this for her.

Without Morgan, I’m not sure where this season is going to go. I fully expect Probst to announce the return of Redemption Island next week, because if there’s anyone deserving of a second chance, it’s someone like Morgan.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.