Weather Channel cuts reality TV to make DirectTV happy

DirecTV and The Weather Channel’s public spat over money has ended after three months, resulting in the network conceding by cutting its reality TV in half during weekdays. In a joint press release, the companies said “The Weather Channel agreed to reduce reality programming by half on weekdays.”

The network’s CEO, David Kenny really didn’t conceal who was making concessions here and who was running scared: “Our apologies to DirecTV and their customers for the disruption of our service and for initiating a public campaign. Our viewers deserve better than a public dispute and we pledge to reward their loyalty with exceptional programming and more.”

Variety reports that this “will not affect Weather Channel’s primetime lineup or future programming development, according to a spokeswoman for Weather Channel,” but has resulted in some weekday repeats being replaced with live weather.

Meanwhile, DirecTV’s chief content officer Dan York bragged how the changes: “I know this was frustrating for many of our customers, but their patience was ultimately rewarded with a better deal and a better product.”

DirecTV previously made a hilarious argument, insisting people didn’t “don’t want to watch a weather information channel with a forecast of a 40% chance of reality TV.” Apparently, a 20 percent chance of reality TV is a more acceptable forecast.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.