Someone please help this man find a home for his Disney, arcade memorabilia

A man who previously appeared on Hoarders is looking for a home for his hoard, which is not what you’d expect (i.e. feces, dead things, or trash). Instead, it’s culturally, nostalgically, and potentially even monetarily valuable things: antique arcade games plus Walt Disney World and other theme park artifacts.

Randy Senna appeared on Inside Edition recently and besides admitting to his hoarding (“I am the good hoarder. Just because you hoard things doesn’t mean you live in filth and have all kinds of dead animals and buckets of urine. My hoarding classification comes from the fact that I have accumulated so much that it is life-encumbering”), he had a plea.

“If I were to find to the right venue where a museum could be created–whether it’s through a large organization like Disney or Universal Studios, or through a state or government agency–I would donate everything … to that cause,” he said. After 14 years in Wildwood, New Jersey, his awesome collection in a former Woolworths is still not open to the public due to never-resolved issues with the city. Randy described his memorabilia as “priceless to me and to most people who appreciate Americana.”

Randy was featured on the 2011 episode of Hoarders that I went behind the scenes for Playboy. Prior to Hoarders, Randy ran a boardwalk arcade, but closed it to take care of his parents.

“I need to get this stuff out before I go,” he told Inside Edition. “I need to get it set up so it can live on. So that once it gets donated to the museum, then I can set it up for them, document it for them, and the history of it. And then I’m free to depart.”

Hopefully, that heartbreaking plea will reach the right person somewhere.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.