The Bachelor remembers Gia Allemand

Last night, ABC’s pre-The Bachelor special included a segment that memorialized Bachelor finalist Gia Allemand, who killed herself last August.

Most of the focus was on her fellow cast members remembering her, though her mother appeared and acknowledged how she died, and the end directed people to ABC.com for more information about suicide prevention.

Chris Harrison introduced the segment, part of which is below, and said that the producers and her fellow cast members “miss her.” The second part also included pictures of her as a child set to Matt White’s “Taking On Water.”

Update: While more than one report has called the tribute “touching,” Jezebel’s Kate Dries calls this “money-grubbing, tasteless and unhelpful,” and says “While ABC gets small credit for acknowledging the circumstances surrounding Allemand’s death at all, they could have decided not to represent the story of her life in such a truncated and meaningless way, sandwiched between utter drivel about Juan Pablo’s season that made it appear as though the death of a human was just another part of the saga that is The Bachelor.”

Jezebel definitely has a point with the bad follow-through: the segment told viewers to go to ABC.com for more information about suicide prevention, but buried that at the bottom of the front page, presenting it in such a way that the word “suicide” wasn’t even visible.

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.