Kate Gosselin’s twins say everything by refusing to talk in this must-watch interview

The most awkward and uncomfortable thing to come out of Jon and Kate Plus Eight may just be two of the kids’ appearance on The Today Show with their mother this morning. Whether all kids are “normal,” as Kate insists, or “have problems”, as Jon said, cannot be answered by a single interview, but this one certainly does not help Kate’s argument.

Savannah Guthrie introduced her Today Show interview with Kate Gosselin and her teenage daughters, Mady and Cara, saying the teens “want to set the story straight about their family.”

Instead of answering Guthrie’s question, Mady says, “Um,” and then smiles. Kate tells her daughter, “Mady, your words,” and Mady gives her a death stare. “It’s your chance. Spit out out.” Cara, too, is silent, and just stares at her mom.

“I don’t want to speak for them,” Kate says, and then proceeds to speak for them, summarizing what they said in a People article. (Here’s one thing Mady allegedly said to the magazine: “People expect us to be damaged.People think we’re supposed to be messed up, like, ‘Oooooh, the poor Gosselin kids, they’re going to be scarred for life, waaaaah.’ Here’s the big news: we’re not messed up.”)

“No, you just said it.”

BURN. Mady later breaks into giggles when Cara refuses to answer a question.

After minutes of near-silence, Gutherie finally asks Kate if it’s okay to “put them on the spot,” whether that is “helpful to them” or “continue[s] the injury to them.”

It’s unclear whether this is stage fright over live TV, two former TV stars conspiring to punish their mother for dragging them in front of cameras again, or just two teenagers. But Kate–again, talking for them–insists they haven’t been injured and that all media appearances are family decisions.

The most emotion they show is when Gutherie asks if they’d do another TV series and they smile and nod excitedly.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.