Big Brother twists: three nominees, weekly MVP

CBS announced two of Big Brother‘s twists today: three people will be nominated each week instead of two, while viewers will select an “MVP” who will have a “secret power.”

A press release says that “contestants will nominate three in this summer’s edition,” and that doesn’t explicitly mention the Head of Household being the person who nominates all three, so while there still is an HOH suite, perhaps their power has changed.

Meanwhile, Big Brother is allowing “viewers to play a crucial role in the game by casting votes for the Houseguest they feel is playing the best game.” While they’ll have a “secret power” of some kind, the show’s producers, Allison Grodner and Rich Meehan, jointly suggested in the press release that it’ll be public enough to affect game play: “The Big Brother MVP will force the houseguests to rethink their strategies. With America rewarding good game play, it doesn’t pay to be a floater this summer.”

There aren’t enough details here to understand exactly how these changes will affect the game, but having three nominees may considerably shake up what could often become a very predictable and routine nomination process, including back-dooring.

The MVP is, of course, reminiscent of things Big Brother has done in the past, but the suggestion that viewers will be “rewarding good game play” could hint at a Glass House-style ability to communicate to the entire cast how viewers feel about individual players. Or not.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.