Bad Girls Club’s horrible idea; Survivor casting story; Bieber’s mom, Bachelorette?

  • The Amazing Race and former The Mole host Anderson Cooper both won GLAAD awards “for their fair, accurate and inclusive representations of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community and the issues that affect their lives.”
  • Oxygen is turning Bad Girls Club into a competition–for cash, not just the attention the women seek by being awful. Ray J will host and fourteen previous contestants will compete to be “Baddest Bad Girl of All Time” and get $100,000. For bad behavior. What the fuck, Oxygen?
  • Justin Bieber’s mom Pattie Mallette wants to be cast as The Bachelorette.
  • NBC announced a new show, Renovation Nation, that’s like a competition version of the now-cancelled Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, hosted by Nate Berkus. (Of course NBC would order a show similar to a cancelled show.) It’s now casting for “America’s best home designers, builders, decorators and craftsmen” to “rebuild and transform rundown homes across America” in teams.
  • Speaking of NBC’s lack of creativity, they are also casting Food Fighters, which will feature blind judging (hmm) of dishes prepared by home cooks and pro chefs, who will cook the same dish.
  • The Bachelor winner Catherine said a friend “signed me up against my will” for the show. So will that make it an arranged marriage, if they do get married?
  • Also, Catherine and Sean are waiting until they’re married to have sex, but Sean thinks his born-again virgin status is “a non-story. Also, their cover photo for People is disturbing.
  • Real World cast member or hockey goalie?
  • American Idol executive producer Ken Warwick doesn’t care if The Voice beats his show in the ratings, since the NBC show doesn’t produce stars like he does.
  • Here’s Ryan Seacrest in 1993.
  • Ryan Seacrest and Julianne Hough broke up.
  • Dance Moms star Abby Lee Miller explains why she is so terrible and screams at children: “I have bigger dreams for these kids than they have for themselves.” Oh, that makes it better. She also says that she’s nice at first but starts yelling if the kids don’t do what she said: “When I tell a child something the first time, I’m nice. The 15th time, I start to get aggravated. By the 30th time, they’re doing 100 push-ups and I’m screaming at them, and of course that’s what they put on TV.”
  • Friend of reality blurred Edmund McCombs has self-published a book, stuck.at.seven [while awkwardly aiming for ten], that includes a chapter about trying to get cast for Survivor. The story has a bit of behind-the-scenes info regarding his contact with a casting producer, but is mostly worth a read for the reason the whole book is: it’s brutally and offensively funny, and the stories from his life are both engaging and thought-provoking.
  • Tip me–with information, not cash. Have links, anonymous reports, memos, corrections, or other stuff? Send them to me.
  • The Sing-Off loses its star

    Ben Folds

    NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


    A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

    Anna Martemucci

    What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

    Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

    about the writer

    Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.