Danielle Staub back to RHONJ? Dog Whisperer suicide attempt; Courtney Robertson on Bachelor brainwashing

  • Jeremy Renner is hosting SNL tonight, and though he has been in The Avengers and done other high-profile acting work recently, I’ll always think of Renner as a cast member on Bravo’s The It Factor. A few years ago, he told me the show didn’t help him get work, but instead “made me more expressive.”
  • Danielle Staub will return to The Real Housewives of New Jersey in some capacity next season, InTouch claims in a story that comes just a few weeks after TMZ insisted that would never happen.
  • The Bachelor villain Courtney “I’ve got the rose!” Robertson, who’s now dating The Bachelorette‘s Arie Luyendyk Jr., told Us Weekly that during her appearance on the show “In many ways, I felt brainwashed,” in part because producers were responsible for romantic gestures she thought came from Ben, like when he brought popcorn on a date.
  • Dog Whisperer Cesar Millan tried to kill himself in 2010 following the death of his dog and divorce from his wife, which he’ll discuss in a Nov. 25 NatGeo Wild documentary, Cesar Millan: The Real Story, that’s about him and the production of his series. Although its trailer is upbeat and says it follows his rise from homeless illegal immigrant to international star, in the film “he talks publicly for the first time about the overdose that almost took his life,” according to the AP.
  • Earlier this week, The New York Times published a brutal review of Guy’s American Kitchen & Bar, the new restaurant by Next Food Network Star winner Guy Fieri. It was written entirely in questions, which Pete Wells says was because “there was so much about the restaurant that I couldn’t figure out.” On the Today Show, Guy blamed the review on an “agenda.” Joshua David Stein’s review in the Observer was even better, I think, thanks to its strong writing and more coherent argument–though it, too, is brutal. For example, he writes that in the restaurant, there are “giant television screens showing an endless loop of Mr. Fieri opening his goatee-framed sphincter-mouth to welcome a panoply of fried matter.”
  • Kevin Clash, the puppeteer and voice of elmo–and the star of the awesome 2011 documentary Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey–was outed as gay and took a leave of absence from Sesame Street when TMZ reported on unsubstantiated allegations that falsely accused of having a relationship with a minor. The man, now 24, recanted his story, but already the story was “threatening Mr. Clash’s reputation and alarming parents and other fans of the beloved children’s television franchise,” as the New York Times reported. Later, The Smoking Gun, which does actual journalism as opposed to passing along rumors without verifying them and causing damage to people’s lives, revealed the identity of the accuser who “is a struggling 24-year-old model/actor who was once arrested for the knifepoint robbery of $250,000 in jewelry from a music manager for whom he interned.”
  • Focus Forward, an online short film series that consists of “30 three-minute stories about innovative people who are reshaping the world through act or invention, directed by the world’s most celebrated documentary filmmakers,” is also sponsoring a filmmaker competition. And one of those submitted films, Bringing Light, was directed by three people who’ve worked on Hoarders and Intervention, among other series. Their film is about a new advancement in brain cancer surgery that uses scorpions. Really.
  • Slate has done the inevitable and turned the Petraeus scandal into a Real Housewives opening sequence:
  • Review: Married at First Sight

    Marriage At First Sight

    In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

    Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

    about the writer

    Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.