Watch Sheep Idol (really); Great Escape cancelled; Christopher Walken, Colin Farrell, Sam Rockwell read Honey Boo Boo

  • Family Guy and Ted creator/writer/voice actor and future Oscar host Seth MacFarlane will appear on ABC’s Shark Tank on Nov. 2 to help someone pitch the sharks. If you still haven’t given this show a shot, you must start watching (tonight, 8 p.m., or watch free on Hulu), because it’s consistently on fire.
  • The most popular TV show in Senegal is This Sheep, which is, honestly, “an American Idol-style nationwide search for Senegal’s most perfect” sheep, the AP reports. The only thing I don’t understand is how three seasons have already aired and we are only hearing about this now, but it’s very real. Watch the finale from last November or many other clips and episodes.
  • The Golf Channel’s competition series Big Break Greenbrier is adding an online competition for eliminated contestants that’s similar to Top Chef‘s Last Chance Kitchen, allowing them to face off until one rejoins the competition. Last Break Challenge episodes will go live after the show concludes at 10 p.m. ET.
  • TNT cancelled The Great Escape, the competition that looked great but had a terrible format. It was produced by Amazing Race executive producers Bertram van Munster and Elise Doganieri, and Ron Howard and Brian Grazer’s Imagine TV.
  • Lauren Conrad is “not looking to go back” to a reality show, although of course, she wasn’t exactly in a show with much reality, so perhaps she should do an actual reality show and see what that’s like.
  • A&E is filming a new show at a South Carolina liquidation and auction house.
  • During a promotional junket for their movie Seven Psychopaths, actors Christopher Walken, Colin Farrell, and Sam Rockwell were asked to read dialogue from Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. The result isn’t quite spectacular but anything Christopher Walken does is hilarious, especially when he says the dialogue is “a little too hard.”
  • about the writer

    Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.