SNL’s failed reality show, Project Runway All-Stars’ new host and cast, True Life lawsuit

  • NBC ordered but never aired a 2004 SNL reality competition show that would have been like The Apprentice with comic actors, judged by Lorne Michaels. Splitsider suggests the show wouldn’t have worked, but I think it absolutely would have: just look at Next Food Network Star. The site also reports on Paul Scheer and Whoopi Goldberg’s Sketch Off, a pilot for a competition between sketch troupes.
  • Nicki Minaj is not starring in her own reality series, but is instead getting “a trilogy of specials” on E! this November.
  • Teresa Giudice is in talks to go the Bethenney route and get her own Bravo series, though the story sounds like it was placed by someone who wants Teresa to get her own show.
  • Project Runway‘s second all-star season has a new host, Carolyn Murphy, but is sticking with a totally different panel of judges, making me totally indifferent to watching, even if the new cast does include Wendy Pepper, Uli Herzner, and Andrae Gonzalo from the show’s early seasons. Speaking of those, this summer, a book that looks back on the series’ legacy was published: Project Runway: The Show That Changed Fashion.
  • Two True Life cast members (from January’s “I’m a Chubby Chaser” episode) are suing MTV for not concealing their address, saying they are now being harassed.
  • ESPN’s great 30 for 30 documentary series is back, and now includes short films on Grantland, starting with a 10-minute film about young Arnold Schwarzenegger. And if you missed the first 30, well, get the DVDs or watch online.
  • The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

    Verlox from The Quest

    A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

    Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


    Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

    Shark Tank

    Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

    Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

    about the writer

    Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.