LuAnn denies cheating, admits lying, but is accused of faking the whole thing

The Real Housewives of New York City‘s episode Monday ended with some truly dramatic footage: LuAnn de Lesseps, the countess who is always quick to judge other people’s behavior, apparently covering up cheating on her boyfriend.

After a (drunken) night out, the other women reported that LuAnn brought home a man, but LuAnn dismissed that and kept insisting that she had a whole group with her. But then, LuAnn called a friend and, in French, subtitled for our convenience, said, “He can’t say that he was here last night with me. I don’t want the girls to know he was here with me.”

It seemed to be clear evidence, proof that she was cheating and trying to cover it up.

LuAnn defended herself, insisting, “I lied about who brought me home. That’s all. Nothing happened. Great TV tho! And Jacques and still very happy and together.”

Alex McCord, however, accuses LuAnn of faking the whole thing. What?! “She wanted to be overheard,” Alex says in her latest video. “I think that LuAnn is fishing for storyline.”

But Alex, who has been revealing behind-the-scenes details all season, smartly points out that “after five years on a reality show, [LuAnn] knows good and well how to have a private conversation if she needs to. She could have texted her friend Cat, she could have texted her. … Her French was so slow on the phone. I think that’s so everyone would be easy with the subtitling, personally–she didn’t need to speak that slowly.”

That’s interesting, especially considering another of LuAnn’s tweets: “Now if I was going to have an affair, would I bring him to a houseful of housewives?” An excellent point. One might write that off as a drunken mistake, but Alex’s explanation seems plausible. LuAnn might be incapable of seeing her own hypocrisy, but she’s not that dumb.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.