Amazing Race’s $2 million prize: there’s a catch

The cast of The Amazing Race 21 has been officially announced by CBS, though it was revealed online much earlier. It includes the stars of The Fabulous Beekman Boys, White Lion and Megadeth’s James LoMenzo, and Amy Purdy, a pro snowboarder who’s also a double amputee.

CBS also gave details about the race’s new $2 million prize, and there’s a catch, as many suspected: “If the Team that wins the first leg of the season can outrace the other 10 Teams and win the final leg of the Race, they will double their money and win a $2 million grand prize instead of $1 million.”

That was predicated by Reality Fan Forum posters, who discovered that the Express Pass wasn’t awarded until the second leg. The forum’s moderator, GeorgiaPeach, pointed out that winning $2 million is likely–or at the very least, it’s likely that the possibility won’t go away early in the race.

That’s because, as Mug Costanza wrote*, “The last two teams to win Leg 1 (Ernie & Cindy, Rachel & Dave) have won the Race. Furthermore, the last time a team won the first leg and failed to make the Final 3 was Season 16 (Jeff & Jordan), and before that, it was Season 12 (Azarea & Hendekea). The team that wins Leg 1 typically finishes the entire Race, even before the Express Pass came into existence.”

This post was edited to add a direct link to, and identify, the original source of the informed speculation.

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.