So You Think You Can Dance wins TV critics’ second reality TV award

28th Annual Television Critics Association Awards Fox’s So You Think You Can Dance has won the Television Critics Association’s second award for outstanding achievement in reality programming, defeating nominees The Glee Project, The Voice, Dancing with the Stars, and The Amazing Race.

The award was presented by the Knoxville News Sentinel’s Terry Morrow and accepted by Mary Murphy and Barry Adelman, Dick Clark Productions’ EVP of television, who said that this show was one that Dick Clark loved.

The show is consistently the best studio-based competition on network television, from its unrivaled talent to its empathetic, under-appreciated host Cat Deeley, and is a winner I’m very content with. (And, of course, I’m thrilled that last year’s winner and this year’s nominee, The Amazing Race, did not win again.)

It’s fitting that the award was presented on National Dance Day, which is why Nigel Lythgoe–its creator and the show’s executive producer–wasn’t here to accept his award: he was at the Dizzy Feet Foundation benefit. That’s also why Mary Murphy left immediately after accepting the award.

Anyway, the series really has elevated dance. It treats it as a true art form, and unlike Dancing with the Stars, most performances inspire awe and even lead to emotional responses from the judges, audience, and viewers. That’s why its talent has received Emmys and why it deserves a larger audience than weaker talent competitions.

Here are all of the TCA Award winners, including the awesome 60 Minutes:

Individual Achievement in Drama: Claire Danes (Homeland, Showtime)
Individual Achievement in Comedy: Louis C.K. (Louie, FX)
Outstanding Achievement in News and Information: 60 Minutes (CBS)
Outstanding Achievement in Reality Programming: So You Think You Can Dance (Fox)
Outstanding Achievement in Youth Programming: Switched at Birth (ABC Family)
Outstanding New Program: Homeland (Showtime)
Outstanding Achievement in Movies, Miniseries and Specials: Masterpiece: Downton Abbey (PBS)
Outstanding Achievement in Drama: Breaking Bad (AMC)
Outstanding Achievement in Comedy: Louie (FX)
Career Achievement Award: David Letterman
Heritage Award: Cheers
Program of the Year: Game of Thrones (HBO)

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.