Bristol Palin blames media for her reality TV career; insists, “I love gays. I’m not a homophobic”

With Todd Palin on NBC’s Stars Earn Stripes and Bristol Palin returning as an all-star on Dancing with the Stars, Sarah Palin’s family has found a home in reality television. As Dancing host Tom Bergeron noted a few minutes ago, the Palins “haven’t really gone full Kardashian,” but it’s impossible to deny that the family is now a family of reality stars.

And why not? Fame leads to opportunities, for both experiences and cash, and there’s no shame in taking advantage of that. (Well, maybe there should be more shame, but that’s another conversation.)

So why did Bristol Palin blame the media for her reality TV career? I mean, besides that it’s an easy, lazy argument that requires no introspection.

Bristol basically said the media won’t leave her alone, so she does reality TV. Also, God got her on the show:

“I just think that God provides opportunities like this, and you can either go out and do them or not do them. I figure that the press is going to be talking about me no matter what, so I might as well be having fun. … I just think that you guys are going to be talking about us either way. I might as well be doing something enjoyable and fun and with a good group of people, and that’s why I’m doing it.”

The latter part is reasonable, but again, why ascribe it to the media? Later, Vulture’s Joe Adalian asked her about that. Part of his perfect question to Bristol:

“If you had decided after the 2008 election to simply go home after the campaigning and raise your child and find work or education in Alaska, would you have been able to sort of live peacefully there? Is there anything wrong with admitting that maybe this is a good gig? It’s fun. You get paid decently. You get to meet interesting people. Is there any shame in just saying ‘I like being a reality star’ as opposed to saying ‘Well, I’ve got to do this because the media won’t leave me alone'”?

Bristol’s unsatisfying answer:

“You know, I couldn’t tell you what would have happened if I would have just gone home. And I like my little life in Alaska with my son. And, like I said before, this is a fun gig. I’m not whining. I’m not complaining about anything. But I’m going to go out there and I’m going to have fun. And ‘you guys,’ I do mean the media. You’re going to talk about me if I’m in my little life in Alaska or if I’m in L.A., so I might as well just have fun with it.”

Hey, look, there it is again: complaining that the media would hound her no matter what. She really has an inflated sense of herself. Pushed by another critic again about the benefits of media coverage, Bristol finally said, “Do I like to provide for my son? Yes, I do.”

In the best moment of the day, however, Bristol was asked what would happen if she was partnered with a gay dancer. Her response:

“I like gays. I’m not a homophobic.”

Yes, she really said it just like that, and then did herself no favors by explaining,

“I’m so sick of people saying that. Just because I’m for traditional marriage, doesn’t really mean I’m scared or anything of anyone else, and I don’t hate anybody. People are going to make up stuff about me no matter what, and whatever.”

Whatever, indeed.

Surprisingly, man not eaten alive on Eaten Alive

Eaten Alive

Discovery Channel’s happy family holiday special Eaten Alive aired Sunday, rewarding viewers for their two full hours of viewing by ensuring that they spent quality time in the company of others instead of wasting that time doing something else that might not have been as satisfying, such as buying things that have labels which accurately reflect their contents.


Winter 2015 reality TV debut schedule

winter 2015 reality TV schedule

Mark your calendars with all these upcoming reality TV show debuts, including Celebrity Apprentice, The Bachelor, and another season of MasterChef Junior, all of which kick off in early January.

There are also 20+ shows debuting in December--including the one-off return of The Sing Off. No winter break for reality TV.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.