Reality check: An actor’s reality TV past, Jersey Shore spin-offs’ declining popularity

Welcome to a new and entirely unoriginal–in name and format–feature, in which I’ll run down the stories that don’t fit anywhere else and/or don’t inspire a full-length post and/or rant. Link suggestions? Please send them!

Actor Emma Stone’s first gig was winning the 2004 VH1 reality series The New Partridge Family; she was Laurie Partridge in the pilot that never made it to series. [The Daily Beast]

Surprising: Snooki and JWoww are less popular than Pauly D, and the Jersey Shore magic doesn’t seem to be extending to their spin-offs. The women’s show had half a million fewer viewers than Pauly D’s. [Variety]

Jack Osbourne, who recently announced that he has multiple sclerosis, said on The Talk that was fired from an unnamed reality show via e.mail because of his MS; a British tabloid said the show is NBC’s Stars Earn Stripes, produced by Mark Burnett. [The Sun]

Frenchie Davis, kicked off of American Idol because the show discovered she masturbated on a web site called Daddy’s Little Girls, has come out as a lesbian. [St. Louis Post-Dispatch]

The Real World: St. Thomas cast member Brandon Kane may or may not be from Southie. Oh no. [BostInno]

If Saturday’s three-hour Big Baboon House special wasn’t enough of a Big Brother parody for you, here’s footage with Big Brother‘s music. [YouTube]

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.