Another Project Runway all-stars to come, but no more spin-offs

Project Runway is currently filming its 10th season, which debuts July 19, and as part of that, there will be a live runway show tomorrow in Times Square at 8 p.m. ET. And its future includes a second all-star season, but Lifetime is not planning any additional spin-offs, thankfully.

That news comes via Lifetime president Nancy Dubuc, who told Emmy magazine that “the first one is always the best one.” The magazine reports that “no new spin-offs are planned,” but that we can “expect a second outing of All Stars,” according to executive producer Harvey Weinstein.

Elsewhere in the article, Weinstein reveals more about the 2008-2009 battle to move the show from Bravo to Lifetime. He claims it “was much more amicable than the press reported.” He said that they “gave these guys [NBC Universal] very minimal dollars to settle–$3 million–with a $100 million contract at Lifetime. It was a cheap price to pay not to go to court again.”

Meanwhile, Tim Gunn has something interesting to say about his show’s former network home: “Bravo has evolved in such a manner that I think we’re too feel-good for Bravo. Project Runway is a feel-good show.”

Calling Runway “feel-good” is a bit too much bullshit for me, but I can’t help thinking that Tim’s analysis of Bravo’s evolution is spot-on.

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.