Probst calls Survivor One World “a letdown,” was the series’ lowest-rated finale ever

Survivor One World‘s long, drawn-out finale was the show’s lowest-rated finale ever, down 30 percent among people 18 to 49 from Survivor Redemption Island last spring, while the more lively reunion lost 29 percent of last season’s viewers.

Overall, an average of 10.22 million people watched, with 8.07 million sticking around for the finale, according to TV By the Numbers.

Unsurprisingly, host Jeff Probst used the opportunity to acknowledge the problem in an interview with EW: “I think this season was a bit of a letdown. No fault of the Survivors, we are the producers. We just didn’t have the standout moments and characters needed for a great season.”

Wait, really? Colton? Tarzan? Troyzan? Kim? Those all seem like stand-out characters to me, though not necessarily in a good way. I think he means they didn’t have standout players, which is a different kind of thing.

Probst also teased next season, promising that it “is going to be a return to GREAT Survivor. I really believe we will remind the audience of how fun Survivor can be.”

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.