God Bless America: My Super Sweet 16 sends man on a killing spree

In Bobcat Goldthwait’s new movie God Bless America, watching a satirical version of My Super Sweet 16 sends the movie’s star on a killing spree, during which he murders the spoiled teenager featured on the show and others. His targets range from an annoying person in a movie theater to those on a show that looks just like American Idol. The movie stars Joel Murray, who was recently in both Mad Men and Shameless.

Obviously, it’s satire/dark comedy, and its tagline is “Taking out the trash, one jerk at a time.” In his director’s statement distributed to the media, Goldthwait says,

“Although a fable, this movie comes from a really sincere place for me. It is about how America has become a cruel and vicious place, while asking the viewer, ‘Where are we going??’ and ‘Are you part of the solution or are you part of the problem?’ Or at least that is what I hope people take away from it. If not it’s just a bloody Valentine to my wife where I get to shoot and kill a baby and a guy who acts a lot like Simon Cowell. I’m fine either way.”

While the movie is in limited release starting this weekend, you can actually watch it via a theatrical rental on iTunes for $10 or on Amazon for $7.

Here’s the R-rated trailer:

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.