Biggest Loser producer admits twist should have been revealed earlier; quitters can’t talk

The executive producer of The Biggest Loser who appeared on Tuesday’s mutiny episode said he thinks producers should have told the cast earlier that someone would be coming back, but this season only “implied” that. Meanwhile, Buddy Shuh and Mark Cornelison are not allowed to talk to the media and explain exactly why they quit the show.

In an extensive interview with the New York Post, executive producer Todd Lubin–who was shown on Tuesday’s episode talking to the five cast members–says a lot of interesting and honest things. Most significantly, Lubin acknowledges that the contestants “made one good point: We should have been clear from the beginning [about the returning-contestants twist]. We did that last season, on Day One, but this season it was only implied and then happened so late in the game.”

Regarding their decision to break the fourth wall, Lubin said, “How can you have two people be gone and not tell the viewers? … We’re not into faking anything, and there’s not a lot we want to hide on this show,” he said. “We struggled in the editing [process] because I still didn’t understand what they were doing or what they were talking about.”

Gee, where could we find that information? Here comes the irony: Buddy and Mark are “restricted from speaking to The Post because they’re still under contract to the show,” the paper reports. Forehead slap.

Just once, it’d be incredible if a network or production company didn’t hide behind contracts and let their casts talk about whatever controversial thing happened–but then, that means the story is no longer in their control.

Surprisingly, man not eaten alive on Eaten Alive

Eaten Alive

Discovery Channel’s happy family holiday special Eaten Alive aired Sunday, rewarding viewers for their two full hours of viewing by ensuring that they spent quality time in the company of others instead of wasting that time doing something else that might not have been as satisfying, such as buying things that have labels which accurately reflect their contents.


Winter 2015 reality TV debut schedule

winter 2015 reality TV schedule

Mark your calendars with all these upcoming reality TV show debuts, including Celebrity Apprentice, The Bachelor, and another season of MasterChef Junior, all of which kick off in early January.

There are also 20+ shows debuting in December--including the one-off return of The Sing Off. No winter break for reality TV.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.