CBS hides details about new Survivor rule; Bill says we shouldn’t “get stressed” over Colton

Bill Posely showed a lot of class after being voted out of Survivor One World by Colton Cumbie and his band of fools, and while he’s using harsher words now to describe Colton–who is apparently a Southern Baptist–he continued that positive attitude even the day after he was voted out.

That’s when Bill said in an extended interview, “I actually have no beef with that guy whatsoever. I think he’s playing a great game and I think he’s a good dude.”

Really? A good dude? That’s nice but also factually inaccurate. But then Bill teaches people like me, who freak the freak out over Colton, that we need to relax: “To sit back and just wish ill in on somebody who doesn’t know any better, I don’t think is really worth my time to get stressed out about it. It’s not that I wish harm on him or anything like that, or I’m okay with what he said, but I feel sorry that he feels that way,” he said.

Today, in his exit interviews, Bill had slightly stronger words. He told Xfinity’s Gordon Holmes that Colton “is a bully. … He’s spoiled, he comes from a very wealthy background. And I believe he’s gotten his way in his life pretty painlessly. And now that he has to deal with people from different walks of life, I believe he thinks he should get his way. He doesn’t realize that compromise or things like that are a part of human interaction.”

Bill revealed two things we didn’t know about him and Colton: First, that Bill is an Army veteran, which he chose not to reveal to his tribe (but is obliquely referenced in his bio), and second, that Colton “claims to be a man of God and a Southern Baptist.” Yeah.

Bill says “fear” is what led him to agree to go to Tribal, and points out in the CBS video linked above that if the whole tribe wanted to vote him out that badly, they could have simply thrown the next challenge, so he was attempting to win them over by going along with their plan–and hoping to sway them to vote out Colton instead of him.

Annoyingly, a CBS publicist refused to let Bill discuss the tribe’s conversations with producers about their ability to give up tribal immunity, as Reality TV World reports; specifically, Bill wanted to discuss “the producers’ thoughts.” But he ends up saying that “it came to our knowledge that it basically had to be all of us or it couldn’t happen.” I think it’s reasonable to assume that, once the idea was floated, the reality producers on the beach checked back with executive producers Jeff Probst and Dave Burris, and then communicated their decision–the formation of a new rule, basically–to the tribe.

This is one of those situations that makes sense out of the Survivor rule book’s many clauses about how producers can change the rules at any time; sometimes, there are circumstances you just can’t predict.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.