Jill Zarin’s fascinating response to gossip that RHONY wants her back

Fired The Real Housewives of New York City cast member Jill Zarin has responded to a gossip report that she was asked to return to the show. She confirms that she was asked to cameo, but says she’s too busy with other projects, such as her appearance on Iron Chef America‘s top-five moments countdown.

Radar reported that “axed cast member Jill Zarin received a call from a show insider recently asking her if she would consider returning to the show,” but “that came just a little too late, [because] the New York socialite and businesswoman has found a new TV gig on a cooking show.”

That’s a pretty transparent report, considering how it describes Jill and frames the whole thing, so it’s not a surprise that Jill confirmed that it’s true, saying “it was more than one person” who invited her back, though it’s not clear if that refers to cast members or producers. However, she says it would have just been a cameo, and, most interestingly, calls out Radar for reusing an old interview and presenting old information as if it was new: “most of the questions I answered a long time ago from and [sic] older interview.”

The writing is sometimes challenging to read but is also amusing, such as the fact that she gets the name of the network wrong (“COOK channel”). But at least she wrote it herself, unlike so many reality stars who write things for web sites.

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.