Amazing Race, Destination Truth, Whale Wars producer dies from poisoning in Africa

A producer who worked on The Amazing Race, Whale Wars, and Destination Truth, among other reality shows, has died after being poisoned in Africa, according to a report. A colleague, who also worked as a facilitating producer, survived.

Destination Truth star Josh Gates first tweeted about Rice’s death on Sunday, and yesterday, tweeted a photo with Jeff, writing, “I can’t believe you’re gone, buddy.”

Citing “a source close to” The Amazing Race, FoxNews.com reports that Jeff Rice’s “body was found in Uganda”; “after refusing to give in to the demands of local thugs, two facilitators, who help with the production of various reality shows, ended up very sick with poisoning of some kind.”

The report says he worked on season 20 of the race, but was not working for the show when he died. Early this morning, a colleague of his tweeted, “sounds like it was one of those thuggish rebel groups, shot him whilst working with the BBC. no clear details yet.”

Rice’s IMDb profile identifies him as a location producer, consulting producer, and facilitator for several reality shows that are filmed internationally. Facilitators negotiate with local officials before a production arrives.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.