Intervention camera operator, who naked woman spit chicken on, answers questions

An Emmy-nominated Intervention camera operator for A&E’s is answering questions on Reddit, offering insight into filming a show about addicts who are often using on camera.

Chris Baron, who has also worked on Hoarders and other shows (such as the awesome and sadly short-lived Showdog Moms & Dads), said he’s the one who a naked addict spit chicken on before fighting with another person (watch that scene).

Answering questions on Reddit, he’s discussed being affected by drugs that are present, and said that the show disguises security as production assistants: “We do have security occasionally if we know that there people or situations that we find ourselves in are going to be particularly dangerous. We just make them out to be production assistants, not to draw any attention to them.”

He also revealed that treatment centers offer rehab for free in exchange for the exposure, and added that sometimes, production discovers the family members and addict are working together try to get free treatment, and although those episodes are cancelled, production still works with them to get treatment.

Chris calls Intervention “the truest cinema verite documentary show that I have worked on,” and said he has put his camera down during an OD and suicide attempt by the subjects he’s documenting.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.