Duggars want Jesus for president but settle for Rick Santorum

TLC reality stars the Duggar family have become the most prominent celebrities to endorse a candidate for president, throwing their weight and fertility behind Rick Santorum–but only because Jesus Christ wasn’t available. Really.

The Los Angeles Times reports that “fixtures from the celebrity firmament have been noticeably absent from Iowa this year” until yesterday, though it adds “Sort of,” because the celebrities were Jim Bob Duggar and “about half of reality television’s Duggar family,” where “Duggar filled some time, telling regular Iowans, who were outnumbered by members of the media, that he is endorsing the former Pennsylvania senator, despite the fact that the Duggars live in Arkansas and cannot vote in the Iowa caucus.”

Jim Bob offered this insightful and not at all cliche assessment of the candidate: “He’s somebody that doesn’t take a poll to know where he stands.” But he did say Santorum isn’t his first choice. “You’re not going to find the perfect candidate unless it’s Jesus Christ,” he told the media.

As obviously consequential as this endorsement is, I think it may fall apart once one of the Duggars Google Santorum.

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.