Fox cancels So You Think You Can Dance results shows

So You Think You Can Dance will return for a ninth season next summer, but it will only air one episode every week, as Fox has cancelled the results show episodes.

Executive producer and judge Nigel Lythgoe announced that on Twitter, writing, “FOX have cancelled the results show so I will have to change the format of #SYTYCD. At least we have another season at the end of MAY.”

That seems to suggest the show was at risk of cancellation, and this served as a compromise, but there have been no further details. Nigel also tweeted, “Don’t worry #SYTYCD fans. I’m thrilled we have a new series. We’ll do our best to find some great talent starting next week in Atlanta.”

While NBC’s The Voice proved that a once-a-week live show combining results and performances can work very well, this is very disappointing because So You Think You Can Dance had, without question, the best results show of any broadcast competition series. It rarely wasted time, but showcased its contestants doing new performances, and its guest performances

In November, American Idol blogger MJ tweeted about X Factor‘s results shows and how So You Think You Can Dance‘s were better, and Nigel retweeted my agreement with her. Alas, it seems Fox does not agree.

Update: Sunday night, Nigel tweeted, “I’m certainly not mad at FOX they have supported #SYTYCD FOR 9 seasons. With the help of [Fox reality executive] Mike Darnell I think we have some great new ideas.”

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.