Bethenny Frankel’s talk show lives, but only for a six-week test; Rocco DiSpirito also gets a syndicated show

The number of reality stars turning into talk show hosts is increasing, as both Bethenny Frankel and Rocco DiSpirito have been given their own syndicated shows, joining Jeff Probst, Anderson Cooper, Tim Gunn, Julie Chen, and others.

Although a report last fall said that Bethenny’s show died because stations weren’t interested, she is getting a six-week test on select Fox-owned stations this summer. Broadcasting and Cable reports that “After Warner Bros.’ Anderson, Twentieth’s Ricki Lake and CBS Television Distribution’s Jeff Probst all were renewed and sold in key markets in early November 2011, it looked like Bethenny’s chances to launch were dead. Fox, however, had always shown interest in the show, and Warner Bros. kept working on a way to get the show on the air.”

Bethenny announced this on her blog, saying, “The queen of too much information is coming to DAYTIME! It is going to be an exciting journey and I can’t wait for you to join me.” In a press release, Warner Bros. Domestic Television Distribution president Ken Werner said, “we determined there was a need in the marketplace for a show that provided daytime women the opportunity to hang out with someone who understood their needs, desires and aspirations… a girlfriend. The research is clear that Bethenny is that person.”

Meanwhile, Rocco DiSpirito, the chef who TV executives are inexplicably smitten with, is getting a half-hour syndicated show next fall. Broadcasting and Cable reports that it will be a “half-hour educational and informational program” and “be part of the new kids’ block that will air on 17 of Tribune’s stations, including in seven of the top-ten markets.” In a press release, Rocco called the show “an exciting opportunity to challenge people to really examine what they eat and learn about the best ways to take care of themselves through food.”

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.