Ben Flajnik’s Bachelor season spoiled

The woman selected by Ben Flajnik at the conclusion of this spring’s The Bachelor 16 has been revealed by “Reality” Steve Carbone, who was sued last week for his spoilers, and his spoiler today comes with a disclaimer about the source of his information.

First, in response to the lawsuit he says he still hasn’t seen, Steve writes that “it’s killing me not to be able to say anything just yet about the allegations levied against me. I’m not very good at keeping my mouth shut about things like this, but I have to for the time being at the request of my lawyer.” Most interestingly, he adds that, “none of the information that I am hereby revealing, or have revealed about the show, was provided to me by contestants, participants, or anyone else under a confidentiality agreement with the show.”

That mirrors what his lawyer’s response said, and is interesting, because everyone who works on or is filmed by the show most likely signs a confidentiality agreement. That suggests to me that sources are people close to contestants or crew members, friends or significant others who aren’t themselves under agreements but get information, because people talk, and there are rarely consequences. However, it doesn’t explain the messages the lawsuit claims Steve sent to contestants asking for information, promising they won’t get in trouble, and offering financial incentives.

On to the spoiler (stop reading if you want to actually waste your time watching the whole season): Steve says that Ben got engaged to model Courtney Robertson, 29, who once dated Jesse Metcalfe. He argues that “Courtney is on the show to promote her career” and the publicity that will follow from the engagement is what she’s really interested in.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.