Salani, Manono are the tribes that will live together on Survivor One World

Survivor One World was confirmed as the 24th season of the show during Survivor South Pacific‘s live reunion, as host Jeff Probst confirmed details of the twist–two tribes living on the same beach–that leaked earlier this fall.

Probst explained that the two tribes will “compete against each other while living together on one island. They’ll have to decide whether to share their resources or leave the other tribe to fend for themselves as they battle it out.” He also said the show “has traveled across the planet,” a nice way to disguise the fact that this will be the fourth season in six seasons set in the exact same place, Samoa.

The only new information Probst offered in the preview was the tribe names: Salani and Manono. While Salani is the name of a village, Manono is the name of an island that’s just off the western shore of Upolo, Samoa’s major island–and more importantly, it’s right next to the show’s base camp and other locations. However, Wikipedia notes that there are no roads on the island, and transporting crew and cast to and from the main island probably makes it more likely that they are just using its name rather than using it as a location.

The preview had some impressive production design, but it mostly looked like production design, rather than actual footage (the season was filmed late last summer). The Dream Team extras were shown standing on a sandbar, which would be an even more awesome twist, but of course that’s impossible for all kinds of reasons. I’d love to see them on an actual island, but I’d guess they’ll just be back on the same Samoa beaches we’ve gotten used to. That’s okay: This twist will be fascinating wherever it takes place.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.