Sucklord wishes his final Work of Art had been a “gigantic fuck you” with “Fuck Jerry Saltz”

Work of Art has been decent this season, although its judges still suck and drag the show down at its conclusion every week. One of the best contestants this season was Morgan Phillips, AKA the Sucklord, but not necessarily because of his art: it was because he was willing to challenge the judges on their stupidity.

Since leaving the show, and staying true to his self-deprecation, he has produced a “Jerk of Art” poster and, of course, action figure. He also admitted that the judges were right about his final piece, a work of street art that was like a 3D maze on a wall.

“I failed the challenge, I failed the show, I failed the competition. It was time for me to get the hell out of there,” told TV Guide. “I think Bill Powers of all people was right: That piece was lacking my voice. That was the problem. Whether it was good or bad, that was the type of thing Sarah K. does. It was clearly more her than me. If it had been a Suckadelic piece, it would have been this gigantic ‘Fuck you’ with all these fucking deranged Star Wars people all over it, and a ‘Fuck Jerry Saltz’ somewhere.”

I don’t think he’s as interesting an artist as last year’s finalists (Miles, Peregrine, Abdi) were, because he’s kind of one-note and, of course, never really backed it up on the show. But now I really want the producers to bring him back just so he can produce a piece that forces the judges to evaluate something that tells them just how stupid they are.

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.