Canada’s Jersey Shore cancelled, but you can now watch the UK’s for free

Canada’s attempt at a Jersey Shore-style show has failed, but the UK’s version, The Only Way is Essex, is now on Hulu.

Lake Shore‘s hilariously weird trailer surfaced about a year ago, but its producer e.mailed cast members earlier this month and said, “I am sorry to say this, but it’s over,” as no network picked up the show. That’s according to The Star, which got comments from cast members who have mixed reactions to the fact that their fame ends with the trailer (“embarassing,” “better for my health”).

Meanwhile, all 26 episodes of the first two series of the UK’s The Only Way is Essex are now on Hulu. The show may be better described as The Hills. Last year, The Daily Mirror called it “Britain’s answer to The Hills and Jersey Shore.” It includes a disclaimer that says,

“This programme contains flash cars big watches and false boobs. The tans you see might be fake but the people are all real although some of what they do has been set up purely for your entertainment.”

Clearly, the show is more self-aware and tongue-in-cheek (a cold sore cream sponsors the show). Best of all, since it was filmed in near-real time, the cast is able to watch themselves in the previous episode–and, of course, hear what the others had to say about them, which affects the dynamics. Here’s the first episode:

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.