Parvati’s “dream come true” trip around the world interrupted by emergency surgery

Survivor Micronesia winner and Survivor Heroes vs. Villains runner-up Parvati Shallow is currently finishing an around-the-world trip as part of CBS.com’s Around the World For Free, and her travels were interrupted by emergency surgery she needed to have after suffering an injury in Africa.

Last summer, Big Brother‘s Jeff Schroeder went on the same journey (read my pre-trip interview with him), which began as a TV series created by Amazing Race 2 winner Alex Boylan. All of its episodes are online. It’s an intriguing concept, and while there’s some entertaining and even educational footage, the series is a lot more telling than showing; Parvati often narrates things that have happened, rather than us seeing them. That’s somewhat disappointing, but seems like the result of both the production (there’s a single camera operator and occasionally a producer) and the relatively real-time nature of the series that relies on viewer suggestions and support.

In the most recent episode, day 90 of her 100-day trip, Parvati arrived at a refugee camp in Kenya that she learned of earlier in her travels; she still has a cast on her arm from Survivor, and I asked her about how she felt about letting people pay for her trip that is being filmed for a series that includes product placement and, of course, makes money for CBS. “In the beginning, it was a little bit strange,” she said. “But then, you kind of get into the spirit of the show. It’s not trying to get money from people, it’s about people taking part in this huge, epic adventure.” She called it a “symbiotic relationship.” Parvati has been surprised by the generosity and excitement she’s encountered from her hosts, who sometimes even “force me to sleep in their bed.” When she’s refused, offering to sleep on the floor, “they won’t let me.”

CBS’ web site notes that to help, “you have to be a local or connect me with a local. No freebies can be sent from afar,” and also notes that “CBS.com will help [Parvati] out with four overseas flights only.” Production also covered her surgery.

Besides the obvious differences, she said Around the World For Free is “so different from Survivor, beacuse they are real people, and you are creating real relationship.” That comes from being “thrown into this situation” that’s a “whirlwind of a time with them,” and those she’s encountered “let you in very quickly because they’re welcoming you with huge, open arms.”

“Survivor is so much about creating relationships with people so you can screw them over in the end; this is you’re creating actual friendships with people. The spirit of the show is genuinely good,” Parvati told me. On Around the World For Free, “you have no ulterior motives; you’re not trying to win. Everyone just wants to help out. It’s nice to be able to trust people.”

I asked her the inevitable question for a show that keeps recycling past contestants, and Parvati said, “I don’t want to play Survivor again, I really don’t.” That’s because “there’s a level of human decency that I think you have to neglect when you play Survivor. … You have to hurt people. I’d rather not spend my life hurting people, and if I can spend traveling around the world making friends, I’d rather do that.” She called it “a great game” but said that “once you’re in Survivor mode you have to wall up and be so defensive.”

Parvati said it was “such a blessing to be part of this experience,” and was especially grateful to her ESP Wellness Center business partner (and former Amazing Race cast member and later casting producer) Erika Shay, who’s running it while she’s gone. “I know it’s not easy. She’s been handling it like a pro.”

On this trip, “I’m feeling very open and vulnerable,” Parvati said. “I would do this every year. This is my dream come true. I love this.”

The Quest ends its journey stronger than it began

Verlox from The Quest

A review of the finale of summer's best reality series, which wasn't always perfect but was thoroughly entertaining right down to the finish, which included phenomenal challenges and special effects. Will ABC give it a second season?

Plus: an interview with the actor who played Verlox and the ogre.


Shark Tank is getting a spin-off

Shark Tank

Companies that get deals on the show will be followed for this new spin-off.

Also: Before the show began, Shark Barbara Corcoran was cast and then replaced--but then she sent this amazing e-mail and won the job.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.