Glee Project’s second season being planned, with possible changes

The Glee Project is the summer’s best new reality competition series, and its stars and producer faced TV critics this morning, and had good news: the series is likely coming back for a second season. Also, more than one of the cast members could end up on Glee, though that would kind of negate the purpose of the competition.

Asked if more than the winner might be cast on Glee, casting director Robert Ulrich said “anything is possible, but there is one winner.” He noted that the winner’s “seven-episode arc is more than most of the kids on Glee,” who are series regulars, get during the season. Ulrich also said that The Glee Project cast are “all wonderful enough to have that chance, and as a casting director, I would keep them in mind for everything else that I do.”

That’s good news for the talented group of contestants, who make really compelling reality show characters, which is part of why the series works so well.

The show had its biggest surprise yet on Sunday’s episode when one Cameron quit the competition because he didn’t want to kiss a girl, leading to a surprisingly compassionate conversation with Ryan Murphy. Cameron told critics that he was “a little bit naive” about what he’d be expected to do, though he said he was aware that “Glee, you know, is sexual.” He said it was “a very emotional time. Everything’s magnified. It was really challenging and difficult.”

As to season two, executive producer Michael Davies said the show has not yet been officially renewed, but “talks have begun” and “a lot of the planning is starting to happen,” he said. “I feel incredibly confident that we are coming back.”

Later, he told me that he expected season two would film in early 2012 and air in the summer, but that could change. And he said that one of the things that bothers me the most, the dubbed performances during the homework assignment challenge, which he noted is similar to Glee itself, is something they’re considering changing for next season.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.