Former Big Brother producer sues agent, claiming he was encouraged to leave the show

A former executive producer on Big Brother‘s 10th and 11th seasons has sued his former agency and agent for more than $10 million in damages, claiming in part that he was offered a contract that would possibly lead to him becoming the CBS reality show’s showrunner, but he turned that down because of bad advice from his agent.

In the lawsuit, producer Scott Einziger claims he “ultimately lost millions of dollars in compensation, career momentum and reputation because he followed [(Michael) Camacho and UTA's] advice without knowing Camacho’s true motivation and conflicts of interest.” The Hollywood Reporter’s story summarizes the part related to the reality show:

“Einziger says he was employed as an executive producer on Big Brother for Seasons 10 and 11 and received an offer to return to the hit show for Season 12 with the potential to become the showrunner. But Einziger says UTA and Camacho instead encouraged him to take a job with a new company being formed under the RelativityReal banner, which was to be operated by former Oprah producer turned reality executive Ellen Rakieten. … Camacho and Rakieten secretly were involved in a personal relationship, he claims. The lawsuit says that Einziger passed on the rich CBS deal on Camacho’s advice but the subsequent offer from RelativityReal was so bad his longtime attorney refused to negotiate the contract.”

A UTA representative told the paper that “UTA and Michael Camacho fully deny the malicious allegations contained in this lawsuit, which not only makes baseless assertions in a blatant attempt to extort payment, but, incredibly, also seeks to reward Mr. Einziger for career difficulties he apparently attributes to anyone but himself. UTA and Michael Camacho will vigorously defend themselves against this meritless lawsuit.”

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.