Bear Grylls “shaken” by fake storm created using wind machines

Man vs. Wild‘s has already been revealed to be frequently staged. And while there is some real danger, Bear Grylls’ complaint about the intensity of a recent situation is pretty hilarious considering it was faked.

The L.A. Times reports that “Grylls, attempting to re-create a storm in northern Norway, had the show’s producers amp up the drama by using massive wind machines — and the result was almost more than Grylls could take.”

“They blasted the hell out of me, and I thought I could get a shelter and fire going, but I just got beaten by this thing and was really shaken,” he recalled, speaking last week from his native England, where he said he had just finished wrangling a horse in from the rain. “The emotion was there because I thought, ‘The reality is, if you found yourself in this situation, you’re dead.’ I have that feeling loads, where I’m thinking, ‘What am I doing?’ But I keep a laminated picture of my family in the sole of my shoe, and their smiles remind me to stop complaining and just get on with it,” he told the paper.

The paper praises his “fortitude,” and the story kind of ironically focuses on “why he’s putting himself in such danger.” Bear does say that “there’s a significant amount of risk, but there is that kind of magic when life becomes very raw and unfluffy.”

Of course, since it was not a real storm, it was entirely within his and the crew’s control, so this sounds a lot like whining that it’s raining–or fearing that you’ll die in a hurricane–while standing fully clothed in the shower.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.