Big Brother lost 1 million viewers since the premiere; Expedition Impossible lost 2.4m

Big Brother 13 started strong, with ratings that were higher than last summer’s debut, but while the show continues to win its timeslot during the slow summer months, about 1 million viewers have fled the show, perhaps to avoid hearing Rachel’s laugh. But the show easily beat Mark Burnett’s Expedition Impossible, which hit a series low in its ratings Thursday.

While 7.71 million viewers watched Big Brother‘s July 7 debut, an a 5 percent increase from last summer’s debut, only 6.73 million watched Cassi’s exit Thursday night, according to a CBS press release, which notes that “was the night’s top program in viewers and key demographics, posting across-the-board increases from last week.”

That was down from 7.02 million people on Wednesday, but up from the previous live episode, which only had 6.48 million viewers.

Again, though, the show keeps winning its timeslot, even though there isn’t much competition in the summer. While the show has a hard-core online audience, the broadcasts haven’t been all that engaging so far, even if Julie Chen did wear a cape and the producers let us listen to Rachel pee.

As to the ABC series, Expedition Impossible “fell another 7% to a series low 1.3 adults 18-49 rating,” according to TV By the Numbers. Only 4.62 million people watched, and way down from its premiere, which had 7.05 million viewers. Although I was really, really excited about Expedition Impossible, and it is well-produced, it is also very boring. It might do several things better than The Amazing Race, but it’s missing whatever would make it truly compelling TV.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.