Out in America: “a more realistic portrait of LGBT life than almost anything seen on TV before”

Last night, PBS stations debuted a documentary, Out in America, in which gay Americans tell their stories. As the trailer below immediately makes clear–watch it!–the documentary instantly shatters stereotypes as gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered people talk about their lives and relationships.

Check your local PBS listings to find out when it’s being broadcast or re-broadcast, though it’s not everywhere: The Salt Lake City Tribune reports that it “will air in 72 percent of U.S. markets.”

Director Andrew Golberg said in a press release that the film “is a more realistic portrait of LGBT life than almost anything seen on TV before. So often, media coverage of LGBT life in America is polarizing or exploitative of controversy and homophobia, or alternately LGBT individuals are presented as caricatures of a stereotype. OUT in America however focuses on empowerment, diversity and relationships.”

The press release notes that the film includes interviews with Bravo’s Andy Cohen; country music singer Chely Wright; “a transgender police lieutenant, who transitioned while on active duty; a Muslim lesbian from the country of Mauritius; a gay rancher; the organizer of Capital Queer Prom; a Latino rapper; a West Point graduate and former Captain in the US Army; a drag queen; a great-grandmother; and ‘The Harolds,’ a giddy bi-racial couple in their 80s, who reminisce, in unison, about their five decades together.”

Watch the trailer:

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Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.