SYTYCD names its top 20, adds online voting; challenge me in a fantasy SYTYCD game

So You Think You Can Dance named its top 20 tonight in an outstanding episode that highlighted its talent, alternating the judges’ decisions with genre-based and larger group numbers. The show also introduced a new set, and it’s significantly better than the previous, dreadful one, but still takes away from the dancers by looming over them. (I really wish the show would revert to the set they had the first few years; bigger is not always better. But at least they made a change.)

The show’s top 20 dancers are Jordan Casanova (jazz), Alexander Fost (contemporary), Tadd Gadduang (hip hop), Marko Germar (jazz), Ricky Jaime (contemporary), Wadi Jones (breaking), Mitchell Kelly (contemporary), Chris Koehl (hip hop), Caitlynn Lawson (contemporary), Jess LeProtto (Broadway), Iveta Lukosiute (ballroom), Miranda Maleski (contemporary), Sasha Mallory (contemporary), Melanie Moore (contemporary), Missy Morelli (jazz), Clarice Ordaz (jazz), Ryan Ramirez (contemporary), Ashley Rich (contemporary), Robert Taylor Jr. (hip hop), and Nick Young (tap).

Next week, after the first performance episode, the show will offer online voting for the first time, although it’s tied to Facebook, just like American Idol. You can only vote by logging in via Facebook, however, but once you do, you can vote 50 times.

Also next week, HitFix’s fantasy So You Think You Can Dance game will award its first points based on the dancers who go home. While I suck at making predictions–I’m often not in lock-step with voters on competition reality shows–I’ve accepted HitFix’s invitation to give it a shot and see what happens.

Join the reality blurred league here (the information you need is at the bottom of the left-hand column), and compete for bragging rights if you beat me and the other players, who include three former So You Think You Can Dance contestants. Disclosure: I suck at this, so you will probably beat me.

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Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.