American Idol once again wants feedback on judges, format, themes, and more

Just like last year, American Idol is seeking feedback about the show and its various components, from new judges Jennifer Lopez and Steven Tyler to the individual theme weeks. The show conducted a similar survey last May, and may have influenced some of this season’s changes. At the very least, it is terrific that the show actively seeks comprehensive feedback from its viewers.

The new survey, which is linked on the show’s web site, starts by asking if “the current season of American Idol is [more/just as/or less] entertaining than the last season,” and also asks about “the quality of contestants is better this year, when compared to last year.”

The most interesting part for me was two questions related to the show’s web site which asked about interest in potential features, including the “ability to stream re-runs of full episodes of the current season or past seasons,” “live episodes as they air on television,” and “songs/performances of contestants.”

There are specific questions about having 15-year-old contestants and three judges instead of four judges, and the survey also asks about the show’s pacing and how often you voted.

You’ll also be asked to identify adjectives that describe your feelings about this season, and they range from “emotionally involving” to “annoying” to “predictable,” and how you watch the show (“attentively, “surf channels while watching,” or “have the show on in the background”) and whether you DVR it more than you did last season.

Every single theme week is listed, as is every guest performance (or most of them), and respondents are also asked how much they like individual components ranging from each judge to the audition, Hollywood, and Las Vegas portions of the competition. The judges’ save, producer consultations with Jimmy Iovine, and group performances are also topics.

For the judges, you can be specific, saying whether they are annoying, predictable, funny, boring, credible, likeable, entertaining, passionate, or give constructive advice. And yes, you can check all those boxes simultaneously.

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.