Gary Busey, genius saboteur and/or crazy person, finally exits Celebrity Apprentice

Gary Busey has finally exited The Celebrity Apprentice, just as his brand of insanity was starting to get old. As Donald Trump is fond of telling himself, he had no choice but to fire Gary, whose antics have essentially made John Rich, Lil’ Jon, and Meat Loaf as crazy as he is. Meat Loaf was reduced to a stuttering mess in the boardroom, where Trump framed the firing as essentially for the benefit of Meat Loaf’s mental health. It was for ours’, too.

While Gary’s ridiculousness has been entertaining, it was very frustrating during last night’s episode, most likely because the editing let us see him through the other three men’s eyes. John Rich’s reaction told us everything we needed to know. He’s so mild-mannered and he has clearly been driven to insanity, if not a spectacular Meat Loaf-style breakdown, by Gary’s antics, and last night, the team–except Meat Loaf–basically checked out to let Gary fail.

The episode was edited to suggest that John Rich’s theory was right: Gary Busey is either crazy or is intentionally sabotaging the team as a way to keep himself around, and probably distract from his own incompetence. We were carefully shown Gary Busey signing off on the menus, and then later trying to blame others for a screw-up on the menu. But it’s still not clear if he’s an attention-seeking genius who turns it on for the cameras, or someone who’s just not on the same mental page as the rest of us.

For the clip of the week, here’s an example of his behavior, and how it has bonded his teammates together even as it has frustrated them. (Watch for the genius, subtle reference in the establishing shot.)

Review: Married at First Sight

Marriage At First Sight

In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.