Cat Deely takes wedding-crazed Americans to UK; Jamie Oliver takes Food Revolution to L.A.

Tonight, two shows with English stars hit American TV: one features the host of So You Think You Can Dance, Cat Deely, and Americans who are crazy about the royal wedding, while the other features chef Jamie Oliver once again trying to fix an American city’s unhealthy eating habits.

On Royally Mad, a two-part series that debuts at 10 p.m. ET on BBC America, Cat Deely will take “America’s five most royal-obsessed fans … on London’s royal wedding path as they live the royal dream and compete to be crowned number-one fan.” (Watch a preview of the wedding-obsessed cast.)

That airs in advance of the April 29 wedding between Prince William and Catherine Middleton, which Cat Deely says has grabbed some Americans’ attention because we lack our own monarchy. “I think it’s because they just don’t have one themselves. On both sides of the Atlantic, we’re brought up with fairy stories and princes and princesses and living happily ever after. The closest thing they have is the first lady and the president, and I don’t think there has been anybody in the glamour stakes since the Kennedys,” she told the AP.

Earlier, at 8 p.m. ET on ABC, Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution won the outstanding reality program Emmy last fall, and for its second season, he tried to go to Los Angeles schools, but got rejected by the school district, which previews suggest will be part of the series. Instead, ABC says in a press release, Oliver “opens a kitchen in Westwood, where he hopes to provide educational tools to combat the obesity epidemic, and attends a school lunch convention, where he discovers a seminar advocating flavored milk in schools”; he’ll also “[attempt] to create a healthy fast food menu in a local drive thru restaurant.”

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In an era of Tinder and Grindr, instant acceptance or dismissal of a potential partner, or instant sex with another body, Married at First Sight offers the thrill of watching strangers deal with the very basics of relationships.

Beyond the headline-grabbing premise, the series has turned out to be a stripped-down, authentic exploration of something very interesting. Read the full review.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.