Carson Daly will host NBC’s swivel chair singing competition The Voice

Carson Daly will host NBC’s The Voice, the singing competition produced by Mark Burnett and Jon de Mol that used to be called Voice of America. It will now air this spring, well in advance of Fox’s X Factor, but of course, it won’t have Simon Cowell.

NBC reality exec Paul Telegdy said Carson Daly, who came to fame hosting MTV’s TRL and currently hosts the network’s late-night show Last Call with Carson Daly, “is the perfect choice to host this exciting new series owing to his credibility, popularity and relevance in both the music world and social media. As he has demonstrated on his late-night show, Carson has the knack of recognizing new talent, which is a key component in ‘The Voice.'”

And Carson Daly said, “I have a true appreciation for authentic, raw talent and ‘The Voice’ is all about finding that. Having worked in the music industry for many years, I am looking forward to hosting ‘The Voice.’ This is a show based strictly on vocal performance — giving all kinds of talented singers the opportunity to reach millions across the country.”

NBC’s press release says the competition “is a show about real talent” on which “Four famous musicians search for the best voices in America and will mentor these singers to become artists. America will decide which singer will be worthy of the grand prize.”

So, yes, it’s The X Factor, except with blind auditions and swivel chairs.

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.