Fabio says Survivor jury “deviated” from Ponderosa voting plan

In his interview with HitFix, Survivor Nicaragua winner Jud “Fabio” Birza is a bit more coherent than I’ve seen in other interviews (it’s no surprise that a jury member wrote 420 next to his name when they cast their vote), and reveals that he was surprised by how many votes Chase received, and those were probably sympathy votes that went against what the jury planned at Ponderosa.

In the interview, Fabio said, “I thought I was gonna win by more than one vote. I think some of the people on the jury did, too. I think some of them were like, ‘Holy shit, we didn’t know it was that close.'”

Why did that happen? Fabio said, “Alina told me that she wanted Chase to get a few votes, so she voted for him. Brenda did the same thing, apparently. She wasn’t decided on who she was going to vote for until she got up there. They all communicate at Ponderosa and they have a game plan and it sounds like some people just deviated from that.”

By the way, Fabio also reveals he was recruited, though he had watched the show. He said, “I’d always understood it and thought that it was a pretty cool concept and so when the casting lady hit me up, I was like, ‘Dang, you know what? I bet you I could do that.’ I was thinking about my theater training and my personality and the physicality and everything that goes with it and I was like, ‘Dude. I have to go do this, because I think I can win.'”

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.