Real World’s Jamie cast in Hangover sequel

The Real World San Diego‘s Jamie Chung has been cast in the sequel of The Hangover, and is challenging The Real World London‘s Jacinda Barrett as the series most-successful alum turned actor. The news came as Boston’s Sean Duffy was being elected to Congress, so there is now a group of people for young MTV stars to look up to as models for how to live their post-show life, or at least they can look up a them once they get their faces out of the puddle of vomit and herpes.

In the film, Jamie will play Ed Helms’ character’s fiancee, according to The Hollywood Reporter, which notes that she “is one of the few new people in a major role to join the production so far.” The paper also identifies her other recent work: Jamie “is one of the stars of Warners’ upcoming Zack Snyder fantasy, Sucker Punch. She recently wrapped a turn as the female lead in Premium Rush, Columbia’s thriller starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt.”

Jamie previously said that her time on the MTV show made it more challenging to get cast in other roles. And besides Jacinda and Jamie, there’s at least one other MTV star who acts regularly: Road Rules’ Dave, who’s done TV work.

The Sing-Off loses its star

Ben Folds

NBC's super-fun December a capella singing competition The Sing-Off is returning, but without its star judge, Ben Folds, and only as a two-hour special. Those are really depressing changes for a series that proved itself to be a super-fun show when it returned last December.


A film director talks about becoming a reality TV character

Anna Martemucci

What is it like to have your life turned into reality TV? Director Anna Martemucci, one of the two directors featured on Starz' exceptional reality series, talks about that, the competition, and her collaboration with her husband and brother-in-law.

Plus: How the show's producers tried to keep the $250,000 competition fair.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.