Kara DioGuardi out of American Idol because “now is the best time to leave”

As expected and reported back in late July, Kara DioGuardi is out as a judge on American Idol after two seasons. In a statement released to by Fox, she said,

“I felt like I won the lottery when I joined American Idol two years ago, but I feel like now is the best time to leave Idol. I am very proud to have been associated with American Idol — it has truly been an amazing experience. I am grateful to Fox, FremantleMedia and 19 Entertainment, as well as the cast, crew and contestants, for all they have given to me. I look forward to my next challenge, and want to thank everyone who has supported me. All the best to everyone on Season 10!”

Fox’s press release also includes glowing quotes from network and show executives: Fox’s Mike Darnell called her “a great addition to our Idol family” and said he has “always been amazed by her eye for talent and her commitment to developing and mentoring artists. She will be missed, and we wish her continued success.” Executive producer Ken Warwick said “she brings an unbelievable amount of passion, creativity and humility to everything she does. It has been a joy working with her on Idol for the past two seasons, and I’m looking forward to seeing what she does next.” And the show’s creator, Simon Fuller, said, “Kara is one of the world’s best songwriters. She has been passionate and committed to Idol over the last two seasons. I will miss having her on the show, but I look forward to working with her in music for many years to come.”

That this was announced at 8 p.m. on Friday before Labor Day weekend is, well, sketchy, and all of these quotes come across as trying to hard to heal the wounds likely caused after Kara learned from the media that she was out and never heard from producers as the news broke.

While I really liked Kara’s addition to the panel during season eight, especially because she seemed to cause all the other judges to step up their game, she didn’t seem as strong this past season.

about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.