Abdi’s museum show “fills a glorified broom closet,” called “undergraduate”

One of Abdi Farah’s prizes for winning Bravo’s Work of Art, a show at the Brooklyn Museum, opened Saturday, and a The New York Times critic slams it , both for his “undergraduate” approach and for the actual space.

Karen Rosenberg writes that his pieces “that were shown in the spacious Phillips galleries on the show’s finale are crammed into the Brooklyn’s much smaller room with a minimum of editing,” and notes that “The Brooklyn Museum has been pilloried for its agreement to mount the show.” Perhaps because of that, Abdi’s work “fills a glorified broom closet” and “looked much better on television.”

As to his art, she writes that Abdi’s “cast resin sculptures of fallen men have energy and a kind of grace” but feature “a conceptual crutch” that “imply that the artist doesn’t trust his own ability to make gesture convey meaning,” and says his “paintings are less impressive, tortured expressionist self-portraits with an obvious debt to Photoshop image filters.”

A Museum Show as a TV Contest Prize [New York Times]

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Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.