Jersey Shore cast, snookin’ with critics, introduces Deena, announces a Snooktionary

MTV introduced the cast of Jersey Shore to TV critics Friday in L.A., including a friend of Snooki, Deena Nicole Cortese, who is joining the cast for its third season, which is currently filming in New Jersey.

MTV exec Tony DiSanto said were “taking a break from shooting,” hence the reason they were in L.A. and not New Jersey. After they entered the room, bringing their collective scent with them, they stood on stage, the only panelists during all of the Television Critics Association’s two-week press tour who were not given chairs. (A friend suggested that was because the women’s dresses were too short and sitting would have presented a real situation; the cast later said it was “for effect.”)

To me, they seemed simultaneously nervous (The Situation kept glancing at MTV’s DiSanto), awkward, and self-conscious, but also had flashes of the genuine personality that made the first season such a hit. Here’s a collection of the newsworthy and otherwise interesting things they said:

  • The Situation insisted that their fame hasn’t changed them. “We’re the same kids. I mean, obviously, I mean if you do see what’s going on right now on TV, we
    interact the same way. When we go out, we have fun. I cook every Sunday. It’s pretty much the same thing. Sausage and peppers, we have fun, and we are just
    ourselves. Really hasn’t changed that much.”
  • Pauly D, however, admitted that producers “did an unbelievable job of blocking that nonsense out, so if you watch, like the episodes that have already aired, you will notice that you don’t see any of that crazy, like, the paparazzi taking pictures or even people running up to us or whatever. It’s just we’re still able to do our
    same thing, hit clubs killer like we do and interact just how we would normally.” (Except it’s not normal for them any more.)
  • Snooki explained her recent arrest like this: “I just went out to have a good time on the beach, and you know, stuff like that happens in Jersey. I didn’t hurt anybody. I was in the drunk tank for a little bit. I had too many tequilas.”
  • Vinny defended the show against accusations that it’s not reflective of New Jersey, especially because so many of the cast members aren’t actually from Jersey. He said that isn’t the point: “We’re not trying to say we’re from Jersey. When we’re from Staten Island, we go to the Jersey Shore every weekend to party. That’s just what we do. That’s what the show’s about. Some of us are from Jersey. Some of you aren’t, but it’s not what it’s about, like, ‘I am Jersey.'”
  • Likewise, they said they aren’t reflective of all Italian-Americans. JWoww said, “We’re not trying to portray Italian Americans. We’re just trying to portray..” “ourselves,” The Situation finished. Pauly D added, “We don’t represent every Italian American in the world. It just so happens I’m Italian, and I’m proud to be Italian. Proud of my heritage.”
  • Snooki brought down the house when she was asked about her new boyfriend. “I’m just snookin’, you know.” Later, she was asked exactly what that meant: “Snookin’ is when you’re lookin’, so if I say I’m snookin’ for love, I’m snookin’ for a guy. If I snooked the night, then I took the night. Get it?”
  • Of course, the answer to her question is “Um, no.” But Snooki added, quite seriously, “My snooktionary is coming out, and you’ll understand my language.”

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about the writer

Andy Dehnart is a journalist who has covered reality television for more than 15 years and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, his writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Playboy, Buzzfeed, and many other publications. Andy, 36, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism. He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. More about reality blurred and Andy.